Monthly Archives: January 2011

The Power Bracelet Question: Is It for Real?

With the recent allegations coming at the PowerBalance company, known for producing and marketing the PowerBalance bracelet, many are now starting to ask if any of these “Power Bracelet” companies can back up their argument that the silicone wristbands actually enhance performance.
“Power bracelets claim they help you achieve optimum strength, speed and balance, something any sports aid aspires to, but the question any consumer ought to be asking is if the product can meet the claim.
Many companies have begun selling a sports aid that allegedly improves upon the body’s natural ability. Such products have gained the endorsement of athletes, and some of the businesses have been supporting cancer research with their profits. These are impressive credentials, but do these products have any basis in scientific, as opposed to rhetorical, fact?
These bracelets, which go by names such as Life Strength, Power Bands, and Power Bracelets, claim to work by augmenting the natural frequency at which the body resonates. No specific frequency is cited however, nor is their method of determining this frequency.
Using a “mylar hologram” the bracelet companies claim they can
store the vibrations of this frequency in order to adjust the body’s natural levels and improve “strength, balance and energy.” These specific claims come from the Power Balance website.
There are several problems with these claims. Firstly the body does not have a natural frequency. “According to a review of Energy Medicine,” by Dr. Harriet Hall published in Skeptic Magazine 2005, crystalline structures can vibrate, and so can the tympanic membranes and vocal chords in humans. While you can find the frequency in a crystal glass, and a singer could shatter it, you couldn’t imagine shattering a cat.

Wristbands Now Good to Learn Math

If your child is having a hard time learning his time tables, there is a new method to keep him thinking about them—trendy, fashionable rubber wristbands ! Imagine having your kids review their math homework with the attire they wear!
“A MOSMAN couple has managed to make maths fun by inventing silicone wristbands with the times tables.
Michael and Landy Randall own Handband, a company that makes and sells customised silicone wristbands.
They started the company in 2005 and have created several different versions of the wristbands, including the Mediband, which provides the bearer’s medical information such as allergies or blood type in case of emergencies, customised promotional bands and silicone digital watches.
The idea for the times table band came up late last year.
The bands, particularly the colourful ones that glow in the dark, had proved popular with children and the couple tried to devise ways to also make it educational” (http://news.google.com/news/search?aq=f&pz=1&cf=all&ned=us&hl=en&q=silicone+wristbands).
What an inventive way to use a wristband!

Wristbands—For an iPod?

Inevitably, when Apple Corp. decides to launch a new product, dozens of companies are eager to launch a product that accommodates and supplements the Apple gear. Such is the case with new iPod Nano Touch, which is small enough to work like a watch—Dick Tracey style. So, in eager haste to work in tandem with this product, companies have revealed all kinds of wristbands, including silicone wristbands , to meet the new need.
“Last September, at one of those periodic events where Apple offers up a new product with much fanfare, Steve Jobs invited the audience to join him in admiring the latest iteration of the iPod Nano. With the touch-screen interface associated with the iPhone and the iPad, the music player had shrunk to a square, weighing less than an ounce and almost comically wee. Some observers took it for a joke when Jobs said an Apple board member intended to sport the thing as a watch. Others didn’t laugh; they sprang into action.
Plenty used the gizmo’s clip to simply attach it to a sturdy watchband, and a few began devising brand-new bands specifically meant to accommodate a Nano. Soon the gadget blogs were pointing readers to wristband sources and offering reviews of the device not as a music player but as a time-teller. Today you can buy several wristbands manufactured by the companies iWatchz and Griffin Technology directly from Apple’s online store, each about $25. (The Nano itself is $150 or more, depending on memory capacity.) And most recently, a Chicago design firm set off a frenzy with its Nano-watch product proposal, hitting a new record on the site Kickstarter, where creative types can solicit donations to underwrite new projects” (http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/30/magazine/30FOB-Consumed-t.html).
It is amazing how much profit can be made by another company’s good ideas!

The Zumba Revolution Includes Wristbands

If you haven’t heard of it yet, start paying attention. Zumba, the new exercise dance craze has hit the country by storm. Started by a small town aerobics instructor, this new phenomenon now has companies jumping at the opportunity to reel in the trends. New Zumba shoes, clothes, DVDs, and, yes, silicone wristbands are part of the garb.
“Zumba got its start in Miami, with an aerobics instructor, Alberto “Beto” Perez, originally from Colombia. One day, he inadvertently left his aerobic music at home and quickly improvised with Latin music from his car. The combination of the music with the intuitive dance moves was an instant hit and his classes grew and grew.

An older woman student enthused to her son about the “magical” class she was taking and Alberto Perlman came on board. He had marketing acumen and was conducting analysis on startups for an Internet incubator with his childhood friend Alberto Aghion. The three Albertos produced some DVDs and suddenly, people asked how they could become instructors.

That prompted training, a complete ZumbaWear clothing line, including rubber wristbands and soon, a sneaker line. The brand has become one of the most popular and fast-growing exercise lines that has grown to 90,000 instructors in 110 countries. There is even a magazine for the lifestyle, Z-Life.

It’s brand is “Ditch the workout, join the party.” It has become a cult phenomenon, like the VW was, and like Apple is today. And it’s also healthy and fun” (http://news.google.com/news/search?pz=1&cf=all&ned=us&hl=en&q=rubber+wristbands&as_qdr=w&as_drrb=q&cf=all).
Have you joined the Zumba craze? Have you seen the wristbands yet?

Wristbands to Stop Bullying

If you have children or if you have followed the news surrounding junior high and high schools, you are probably aware that bullying is becoming an increasing serious problem. In one middle school, two students took the initiative to stop bullying by handing out silicone wristbands .
“Two Geneva Middle School South students are taking on bullies, spreading the message that “Vikes Play Nice” to their teachers and schoolmates on special wristbands.
The two came up with the idea after an assignment in their seventh-grade language arts class, in which students were to research the concept of empathy and how it could be put in to action.
Monica Altmayer and Pranita Sarangabany decided to raise awareness about bullying and money for the Trevor Project, a national organization that focuses on crisis and suicide prevention among lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or questioning teenagers. Monica knew of the charity because it was the one the family of Michael Kimmer chose for a memorial fundraiser in 2010 several months after the Geneva High School freshman killed himself” (http://news.google.com/news/search?pz=1&cf=all&ned=us&hl=en&q=rubber+wristbands&as_qdr=w&as_drrb=q&cf=all).
Knowing the seriousness of this problem, I hope we can spread a similar message to students across the country.

Fashion for Cheap

The constant desire to be fashionable can take a significant hit on the pocket book. Dresses, jeans, shoes, jewelry—all likely to be expensive if we hope to follow the trends. But there are many fashion statements that come cheap. The silicone rubber wristband is a perfect example.
“You do not need to spend a lot of cash to be fashionable. Designer clothes and name brand shoes are always desirable, but considering the current state of the economy, it just isn’t practical to fork out huge sums of money for items such as these.

Fashion accessories are needed to complete any look. Like any apparel, accessories can be quite pricey. Jewelry is the most common item picked up by the fashion conscious. Quality jewelry however, will always carry a hefty price tag. Of course, there is always faux jewelry to consider but who wants to buy something fake?

Wristbands are an excellent alternative to high value ornaments or fake jewelry. Silicone wristbands are available in many different and exciting colors. Made from quality silicone, these bands are hypoallergenic and can be safely worn by children and adults alike.

With so many hues to choose from, these wristbands can match virtually any outfit. Bright, cheerful colors can be worn by those who want to work out or romp around. Cool, relaxing colors could match that jeans and plaid shirt outfit. A dark colored wristband could even be tastefully worn to complement a semi-formal attire. Except maybe for a black and white tuxedo and a ballroom gown, a silicone wristband could be picked out to complete any look” (http://news.google.com/news/search?pz=1&cf=all&ned=us&hl=en&q=rubber+wristbands&as_qdr=w&as_drrb=q&cf=all).
What other fashion statements can you think of that won’t cost a fortune to display?

The New Watch?

Do you wear a watch? How many people do you know that wears a watch? Even 10 years ago it seemed that nearly everyone had one everywhere they went. It’s hard to believe but that is because 10 years ago few people had cell phones. As the world of electronics has shifted our landscapes dramatically, companies have looked for new ways to re-invent the watch. rubber wristbands , iPhones that wrap around the wrist. What idea will be the success?
“Swap’s fortunes will have been done no harm by the appearance of the new iPod nano, a cute mp3 player in Apple’s range that was unveiled back in September and is the size and shape of a wristwatch face. The presence of an analogue clock on the device’s lock screen only emphasises the similarity, and when CEO Steve Jobs casually mentioned as an aside that an Apple board member intended to wear it as a watch, that was enough for yet another small industry to piggyback on the popularity of an Apple product. Cheap and cheerful wristbands were hurriedly launched by companies such as Griffin, while more sophisticated offerings started to show up on design blogs. A company called MNML Studio sought investment via the website kickstarter.com for two wristbands that promised to transform the iPod nano into the “world’s coolest multitouch watch”; it ended up becoming the highest funded project in Kickstarter’s history. Digital trickery on the wrist is still an enticing prospect, clearly.
But how well does it work in practice? The one obvious boon of having our digital lives encased in a wrist-mounted gadget is that we’re much less likely to lose it; it’s bound to us, literally. But when the website Engadget reviewed the iPod nano as a watch, it didn’t score particularly highly.
Firstly it’s quite big (although if you’re a bloke that’s probably less of an issue.) Secondly, you can’t just glance at the time – you have to wake up the screen first, which can ultimately get a bit irritating. And if you want to listen to music – which is, after all, the point of the iPod nano – a cable running from your ears to your wrist isn’t the best ergonomic solution; fling your arm out to hail a bus and your headphones ping out of your ear. It’s perhaps telling that the aforementioned watch design competition on the giffgaff forum was won by a circular pocket watch rather than something that sits on the wrist. Of course, the technology industry will eventually get the period of experimentation out of its system and establish what does and doesn’t work” (http://news.google.com/news/search?pz=1&cf=all&ned=us&hl=en&q=rubber+wristbands&cf=all&as_qdr=d&as_drrb=q).
What kind of watch would it take for you to start wearing one again?

Wristbands Steal Show at Sundance

So, Robert Redford’s big film festival in the Wasatch Mountains of Utah draws a notable crowd each year with sizeable celebrities and films that soon take over Hollywood. So who stole the show this year? Some might say it was a little star-shaped blue rubber wristband .
“As the Sundance Film Festival came to a close today, one thing was certain: there was a new favorite band in town. No, it wasn’t one of the awesome performers on stage at the official Sundance ASCAP Music Cafe. It was the iVolunteer.org gagabandz seen on everyone’s wrists there!
iVolunteer rocked the 2011 Sundance Music Cafe in Park City where, strangely enough, our funky turquoise rubber-star wristbands were the must-have swag at the Sundance Music Cafe on Main Street. Filmmakers, fans, fashionistas and festival attendees at ASCAP’s Music Cafe went gaga over them. Many were seen wearing their iVolunteer.org gagabandz proudly all over Park City — off the slopes and on!
We caught some of them in action. Who do you think wore it best?” (http://news.google.com/news/search?pz=1&cf=all&ned=us&hl=en&q=rubber+wristbands&cf=all&as_qdr=d&as_drrb=q).
I guess we will see if this trend spreads now to the public.

Twitter, Athletes, and Armstrong

If you are a sports fan at all, you have probably been aware of the barrage of Twitter posts by some of the world’s most renowned athletes. Whether or not you think this is obnoxious or a great way to communicate with the stars, it is interesting to follow what they have to say. One of the recent recognitions of a Twitter post is about one made by Lance Armstrong, famous for the Livestrong wristbands .
“While Twitter favours the frivolous, it has also become the domain of the earnest. Maybe because they spend their lives in change rooms adorned with slogans, there is nothing some athletes like better than rehashing motivational phrases.
@LanceArmstrong: ”Strength does not come from physical capacity. It comes from an indomitable will.” Mahatma Gandhi.
(And, yes, Armstrong did come up with ”Livestrong” – possibly meaning Live Strongly – which is no Gandhi, but fits much better on a yellow wristband.)
But with Twitter quickly making the leap from novelty contemporary haiku to global communications phenomenon, the athletes’ hope of corresponding directly with the public is now being compromised by the old media’s obsessive Twitter reporting” (http://www.smh.com.au/sport/witty-stars-or-just-selfindulgent-twits-20110128-1a89o.html).
Will Twitter-mania survive, or is this just a trend in communication technology?

Honoring Business Owner

In honor of man who owned a small nursery and recently passed, family and friends are working to remember him through his nursery. Customer Appreciation Day was a perfect opportunity to remember him through gift bags that included totes and rubber wristbands .
“Plumline Nursery in Murrysville, Pa., was founded by the late Bill Tribou. To honor his father — and to say thanks to the garden centers’ customers who became part of Bill’s legacy, Bill’s son and new company owner Micah crafted Customer Appreciation Days last year.
And, boy, did they do some honoring and appreciating. “It was a wildly successful event,” Micah said recently. “There was the smell of hamburgers grilling all day, free drinks, free sno-cones, a live band playing, fun games with great plant prizes, exciting seminars featuring local Emmy winner Doug Oster and a duck pond (with different discounts on the bottom of each duck). We also had free landscape ‘designs from photos’ by our design staff. People had to stand in line and take numbers for this one.”
The garden center staff passed out free tote bags, seed packets and purple wristbands, to boot. “The seeds were forget-me-not packets imprinted with “In memory of Bill Tribou,'” Micah said. “The purple wristbands were like the yellow Livestrong ones and said “Bill Tribou: The Legend, Plumline Nursery.'”
This was a great cause and a great set of days that strengthened an important bond established long before. And it was a great way to ensure that bond will only grow.” (http://www.gardencentermagazine.com/cha-ching-1-27-plumline-nursery.aspx).
What a great way to remember a loyal and well-loved person in a small community!